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Affliction Z: Fractured (Part 1) by L.T. Ryan

Survival in numbers or solo. This story features three groups of individuals with a common theme survival. This is book one in this series. Oct 11, vivian rated it it was amazing. Great read The story continues with a group stuck in the Caribbean islands with another untrustworthy group and Sean stuck in Virginia in a militia group with 2 girls and a young boy captured by scavengers. May 10, Joe Williams rated it it was amazing.

Good book Liked the pace of book not hurried and like the plot twist. All in all a very relaxing read although not really interested in zombies. May 09, Jim Sturgill rated it it was amazing. These books are gripping and fast paced.

Affliction

This tale grabs you from the first chapter of Patient Zero and doesn't let go! Nov 11, Mike McElveny rated it really liked it. F red f Goog one Ejoyed the vjtfv htuhfdhgt yt? Gredgyrddg hfshgrth bcc Dr vfuhd5tgfdggd5gd fr uhhhc ft ggg f ry hb bff r f6 uh fr7 vs d5v gvvgJj. Aug 02, Grendaliz Torres rated it it was amazing. Great series Each book was harder to put down then the book previously. You quickly get attached to your fav characters. Apr 25, Doug Howles rated it it was amazing. Can't wait for part 2 Fast read, great plot lines. Unfortunately the story is all to believable with the all for yourself mentality.

Ryan leaves you waiting for more. Judit DeLowe rated it liked it Oct 16, Mike Lamprecht rated it it was ok May 29, Paul rated it really liked it Jul 28, George Tarr II rated it liked it Aug 13, France rated it it was ok Oct 19, Patricia Tardiff rated it it was amazing Dec 15, The characters, the story, how Banks' people speak, they are never trying to make a statement or represent a certain condition.

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In the act of being, though, they make broader statements about the human condition. I feel like I'm writing in circles. I'm indulging in a little pretension myself. So I'll stop and just tell you, point-blank, go and read 'Affliction. View all 4 comments. Sep 28, Larry Bassett rated it really liked it Shelves: This is my second Russell Banks and it will not be my last. I read Lost Memory of Skin as my first and that encouraged me to move on to this one, albeit many months later. Anyone have any suggestions from those books about where to head next with Banks? The story Affliction is told by the younger brother of the protagonist, Wade Whitehouse.

It is not complic This is my second Russell Banks and it will not be my last. It is not complicated. Wade wanted his father dead. With this as a background, Wade grew up and hit other people, including his wife. Wade had simply hung his head and confessed that, yes, in the heat of a quarrel, he had hit her. People shook their heads sadly when they heard this, but they understood: Lillian was a hard case, a demanding intelligent woman with a lot of mouth on her, a woman who made most people feel that she thought she was somehow superior to them, and no doubt she made Wade feel that way too.

A man should never hit a woman, but sometimes it is understandable. He does not laugh or smile very much, in fact, hardly at all. The presentation of these events by Russell Banks is so detailed as to put you right there with Wade. His twice wife Lillian saved him from that once, twice. Without Lillian, without her recognition and protection, Wade would have been forced to regard himself as no different than the boys and men who surrounded him …deliberately roughened and coarse, cultivating their violence for one another to admire and shrink from, growing up with a defensive willed stupidity and then encouraging their sons to follow.

Fractured: Part 1

Maybe this is just the story of a boy who grew up and became his father, a violent drunk. But you know how drunks can be sensitive? It balances out the violent part. But maybe balance is the wrong word. It was deer hunting season in the story. The time when men go into the woods to kill. View all 3 comments. Jan 07, Carol Storm rated it liked it. This is a powerful book, and I enjoyed reading it. The pain of Wade's childhood and the lasting damage caused by his father's abuse are absolutely convincing.

The trouble starts when Russell Banks tries to make larger points about the hopeless working class and the injustices of the American system. Banks is both a defeatist and a pessimist. His outlook is rigidly fatalistic.

He tends to force symbolic meanings into the story based on the abuse the main character suffers. The problem is, Wade get This is a powerful book, and I enjoyed reading it. The problem is, Wade getting beat up by his father is not a metaphor for capitalism. It's just Wade getting beat up by his father. Not all working class kids are victims of abuse. And not all victims of abuse are doomed to working class poverty. It's ironic that Banks, a leftist baby boomer if ever there was one, has never heard of the Beach Boys.

Affliction (Knights Rebels MC 2) by River Savage Audiobook Part 1

The Wilson brothers, Brian, Dennis, and Carl, grew up in a dingy blue-collar home and were raised by a savage brute much like Wade's father. Most certainly their lives were tragic, and their story is a sad one. But it also involves all the things Russell Banks can't write about -- such as triumph over tremendous odds, the redeeming power of music, and yes, the opportunities offered by the American Dream.

It's just that the truth is often more complex, more exhilarating, and at the same time more tragic than Russell Banks' vision of America. Nov 07, S. A sad and powerful story, this is one of the best novels I've read so far this year. Early on there's a sentence about the snow falling and gravity, and I can't help but think of it as a metaphor for Wade, the main character, who seems hellbent on a path to his inevitable ruin. Banks is somewhat of a fatalist, even though he draws a contrast with Wade's brother Rolfe, the narrator, who seems both through character and circumstance he managed to avoid childhood beatings to escape a life like Wa A sad and powerful story, this is one of the best novels I've read so far this year.

Banks is somewhat of a fatalist, even though he draws a contrast with Wade's brother Rolfe, the narrator, who seems both through character and circumstance he managed to avoid childhood beatings to escape a life like Wade's. I felt an enormous sympathy for almost every character in this book. Banks does character and plot very well in my opinion and I read it with a kind of drooling dread, i. I knew everything would go wrong, I even guessed how they would go wrong, but still that was the medicine and I knew I had to swallow it.

In my opinion "Continental Drift" was superior to "Affliction," but I still ate this up like the pessimist I am.

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Banks has thus atoned for that let-down "Rule of the Bone. Small town New Hampshire police officer and local well digger Wade Whitehouse is having a crummy week. A crummy week following a crummy life. Overall a powerful novel, with some great characters, dialogue and absolutely fine writing. Then why did it take me three weeks to finish this novel? Told through the point of view of Wade's youngest brother Rolfe, who has pieced the events together in so horribly an obsessive manner that he can imagine what Wade was eating, thinking and f From Casual Debris.

Told through the point of view of Wade's youngest brother Rolfe, who has pieced the events together in so horribly an obsessive manner that he can imagine what Wade was eating, thinking and feeling throughout these tragic events. Rolfe's obsession came about as a result of wanting to understand the horrible tragedy that Wade's life had become, and to come to terms with those final hours leading to horrible acts of violence.

An ingenuous method and wholly believable, yet what slows down the narrative is the vast amount of detail, often repetitive, that I felt were not only needless, but intrusive. Reading through these details I found myself skimming, my thoughts drifting off, wondering why the narrator is so desperate to pound certain points across, as well as certain minor details. The more he pounded, the less I was inclined to buy into his theories, as though we were kids in the schoolyard and he wanted so badly for me to believe his incredibly tall tale that to help convince me he was being insistent, nodding his head aggressively and staring at me as though daring me to disbelieve.

Yet because I trusted him at the beginning, this insistence was simply annoying, and I wanted to tell him to just go on with bloody story already. How exhausting, to the point that I was longing for the schoolyard bell to ring and quiet the little bugger. And yet it is a powerful novel with some great moments. I just wonder if there's an abridged version available somewhere Aug 24, Julie Christine rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a dark, disturbing book but so compelling.

Wade Whitehouse is caught up in a maelstrom of violence and self-destruction that is certain to end in a horrific last stand. The story is told with great care by his younger brother and is set in a New Hampshire town in the midst of a shrill winter. Banks once again holds me in the spell of his masterful prose. Nov 17, Ubik 2. Apr 22, Joey Gold rated it really liked it. I half-expected something like "Mystic River"; a manly tale of complex relationships against a gritty scenery.

This book, however, is different in the way it goes deep into Wade, the main character. Although the landscape is rough and bleak, the way Russell Banks explores Wade's psyche is anything but virile. The atmosphere is pessimistic. Even when an occasional bright color beams its way in, such as the presence of Wade's joyful girlfriend Margie or that of a Halloween party, the tone and the rhythm of the language is always quite dour. Self-pity is in my opinion the main venom that causes Wade's misfortunes. Throughout most of the book he tries to ignore an ongoing toothache. I think this pain symbolizes the sort-of "macho" modesty Wade is afflicted with.

I think there's a Walt Whitman element in this book, in the way Banks treats nothing as obvious or trivial. In other words, he "gets" into details; techniques of snow plowing, histories of statues, sudden brief biographies of minor characters. These passages add to the atmosphere but aren't strictly related to the storyline. The novel "Stoner" by John Williams is a great example of how to incorporate, or "sneak in" indirect details without distracting or overwhelming the reader.

Glenn Whitehouse, Wade's father, is a fantastic character. Along with Wade, Glenn is the most complete character in the book. Most of the supporting cast, such as Wade's younger brother and the narrator , Lillian — his ex-wife, Jack — his workmate, etc. Glenn, on the other hand, hardly utters five sentences in the book and maybe a dozen or so muttered curses and raging snarls , but leaves the biggest impression. Needless to say, this is an imperfect yet powerful book. If it were a piece of music — maybe "Nebraska" by Bruce Springsteen or a great Neil Young song comes to mind.

Something that is recorded with a rough, ragged sound but nevertheless has undeniable emotional energy. Leggendo il meraviglioso "Tormenta" di Russell Banks ho riprovato vividamente quella sensazione di inconfessabile ammirazione preadolescenziale, finalmente libera dal protetto perbenismo dell'educazione provinciale e rivisitata alla luce dell'esperienza di un adulto. In ogni caso si tratta di un romanzo che consiglierei senza dubbi, probabilmente uno dei migliori letti in questo Jun 03, Marika rated it really liked it.

Take a guy that wants to be good, wants the simple things most people want --home, family, job. Then watch as life beats him up. As spirals will do, this one starts out slow and gentle, but unrelentingly picks up speed and dumps its victim out in hell. I guess it isn't a unique story.

What sold it for me was the total believability of the main character, Wade. I don't actually know anyone like him, but I "know" him. I see him everywhere, just trying to keep it together but ne So sad. I see him everywhere, just trying to keep it together but never quite managing to gain ground. For every success story, there are probably dozens of Wades who want to succeed but can't -- no means, no coping skills.

Then layer on the depressed rural town in the book and outside my window, snow flying and wind blowing in the book and outside my window, rifles cracking in the book and outside my window You get the idea. All in all, an excellently done character study. Am I reading too much into it when I say I believe he chooses his victims carefully, if subconsciously? Of all the people in that town who would have made good targets, Wade only kills the man he once was and the man he was becoming Was he committing suicide in some "acceptable" manner?

Or was he murdering himself? I've scanned a bunch of community reviews and I don't see anyone else suggesting this interpretation. Affliction was the first novel I have read by Russell Banks. This is a difficult novel and a difficult author to which to describe my reactions. There is a realism here that some part of me feels that I should appreciate and should benefit from. Similar small town trying to survive given the l Affliction was the first novel I have read by Russell Banks. Similar small town trying to survive given the loss of the historical businesses that created it in the first place.

Most inhabitants of the world that Russell Banks creates are just surviving. The story, though, is very well told for the most part, and there is depth and a richness to the characters. I enjoyed the writing; I found it simple, unpretentious and consistent with the story being told. I think one of my GR friends said that she needed to see growth in the main characters. There are certainly some lessons that can be learned, but struggled to relate to them.

So while I respected and admired the end result and found it somewhat engaging, I am not drawn to it and am not sure I will read more of Russell Banks. There is just too much more to enjoy. Sep 02, Jennifer rated it liked it. Banks' book starts off a bit slow with the overwhelming details of the town dwellers and the locale in NH. It helps but slows down the narrative before we're able to get to the heart of the story. Even the family conflict and addiction that becomes such a curse for Wade is presented almost halfway through the book culminating in a lot happening in the last few chapters.

I enjoyed Banks' writing and the details we get into this freezing, working class town that tends to break people down emotiona Banks' book starts off a bit slow with the overwhelming details of the town dwellers and the locale in NH. I enjoyed Banks' writing and the details we get into this freezing, working class town that tends to break people down emotionally and physically over time considering many don't seem to leave unless pressed.

The story is told by Wade's brother from what he considers to be Wade's POV considering they are almost one in the same on most counts. And with inserts of his interviewing people and how much information was gained a vivid picture is created of what would become Wade's downfall and a mystery that others don't want to dwell on, but that our narrator, Rolfe, needs to find answers to in the end.


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Excellent story and the characters are well thought out. Ryan brought to life or undead existence if you prefer a non-stop ride for any lover of zombie books My girlfriend started reading them, and then I wound up buying them so there we were laying in bed, both of us reading the same ebooks Patient Zero Affliction Z: Abandoned Hope Affliction Z: Descended in Blood Affliction Z: Fractured Part 1 - coming March, !